About Acupuncture

What can be treated with acupuncture and Oriental Medicine?

Townsend Acupuncture officeIn short, any condition that does not require immediate surgery or emergency medicine should first be treated with the gentlest and safest medical modalities: diet, acupuncture, massage, exercise, and herbal medicine. It is a great injustice to put potentially dangerous chemicals into the body damage before first trying therapies that are known to be safe. The World Health Organization published a report in 2002 within which they have disclosed all the different conditions which research has proven to be effectively treated with acupuncture. They also discuss a multitude of other conditions of which acupuncture has shown effect but the research is inconclusive. [Source]

Conditions or symptoms that acupuncture has been proven to be effective:

  • adverse reactions to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy
  • allergic rhinitis (including hay fever)
  • biliary colic
  • depression (including depressive neurosis and depression following stroke)
  • acute bacillary dysentery
  • primary dysmenorrhoea
  • acute epigastralgia (in peptic ulcer, acute and chronic gastritis, and gastrospasm)
  • facial pain (including craniomandibular disorders)
  • headache
  • essential hypertension
  • primary hypotension
  • induction of labor
  • knee pain
  • leukopenia
  • low back pain
  • correction of malposition of fetus
  • morning sickness
  • nausea and vomiting
  • neck pain
  • pain in dentistry – including dental pain and temporomandibular (TMJ) dysfunction
  • periarthritis of shoulder
  • postoperative pain
  • renal colic
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • sciatica
  • sprain
  • stroke (cerebral vascular accident, CVA)
  • tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis)

Conditions or symptoms that appear to be effectively treated with acupuncture but which need further research before the W.H.O. will endorse acupuncture as unquestionably effective treatment:

  • abdominal pain (in acute gastroenteritis or due to gastrointestinal spasm)
  • acne vulgaris
  • alcohol dependence and detoxification
  • bell’s palsy
  • asthma
  • cancer pain
  • cardiac neurosis
  • chronic cholecystitis with acute exacerbation
  • cholelithiasis
  • competition stress syndrome
  • closed craniocerebral injury
  • non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
  • earache
  • epidemic hemorrhagic fever
  • simple epistaxis (without generalized or local disease)
  • eye pain due to subconjunctival injection
  • female infertility
  • facial spasm
  • female urethral syndrome
  • fibromyalgia and fasciitis
  • gastrokinetic disturbance
  • gout
  • hepatitis b virus carrier status
  • herpes zoster (human (alpha) herpesvirus 3)
  • hyperlipemia
  • hypo-ovarianism
  • insomnia
  • labour pain
  • insufficient lactation
  • non-organic male sexual dysfunction
  • ménière disease
  • post-herpetic neuralgia
  • neurodermatitis
  • obesity
  • opium, cocaine and heroin dependence
  • osteoarthritis
  • pain due to endoscopic examination
  • pain in thromboangiitis obliterans
  • polycystic ovary syndrome (stein-leventhal syndrome)
  • postextubation in children
  • postoperative convalescence
  • premenstrual syndrome
  • chronic prostatitispruritus
  • radicular and pseudoradicular pain syndrome
  • primary raynaud syndrome
  • recurrent lower urinary-tract infection
  • reflex sympathetic dystrophy
  • traumatic retention of urine
  • schizophrenia
  • drug-induced sialism
  • sjögren syndrome
  • sore throat (including tonsillitis)
  • acute spine pain
  • stiff neck
  • temporomandibular joint dysfunction
  • tietze syndrome
  • tobacco dependence
  • tourette syndrome
  • chronic ulcerative colitis
  • urolithiasis (kidney stones or bladder stones)
  • vascular dementia
  • whooping cough (pertussis)
  • Chloasma (melasma)
  • central serous choroidopathy
  • color blindness
  • deafness
  • hypophrenia
  • irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • neuropathic bladder in spinal cord injury
  • chronic pulmonary heart disease
  • small airway obstruction
  • breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • coma
  • convulsions in infants
  • coronary heart disease (angina pectoris)
  • diarrhoea in infants and young children
  • late stage viral encephalitis in children
  • progressive bulbar and pseudobulbar paralysis

What to wear to your acupuncture treatment

On days that you are receiving acupuncture, it is advisable for you to wear loose-fitting clothing that will be comfortable to lie down in but will also allow the acupuncturist access to multiple regions of your body. A tank top and loose fitting shorts are perfect for many treatments, but at times even that would prohibit access to necessary acupuncture points. It is perfectly appropriate to bring a change of clothes if you desire. An acupuncture visit is often similar to a massage in that you will need to undress and you will be provided with a sheet or gown to cover yourself with.

It is very important that you are comfortable, regardless of gender, and you must notify your acupuncturist if you are uncomfortable in any way. We work with a very diverse population and strive to be sensitive to the modesty of our patients. We are here to help you and will do whatever is necessary in order to insure that you feel safe and relaxed; but in the end, it is still up to the patient to communicate with us about what they are experiencing.